This dad deserves the award for most creative solution to common elementary school problems.

When Bryan Dunn, a 37-year-old graphic designer and illustrator in Eden Prairie, MN, learned he had to pack lunches in brown paper bags for his son’s kindergarten field trips, he figured it must be a burden to keep that many identical bags separated, even if the kids’ names were on them.

Dunn found a pretty awesome way to make his son’s bags stand out.


He did this…
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And this…
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And this.
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The project, which began a couple of summers ago, quickly became a ritual, and has spanned both kindergarten and first grade.

“I had seen something years before, where a dad had drawn on his kids bags, so I started doing it," Dunn tells Ellen’s Good News. “I draw all the time, and this was a fun daily challenge, as well as to give him something to bring to kindergarten that was special.”

Lizards, bears, dinosaurs and minions, Dunn’s lunch bag drawings cover well-known cartoons and the creations of his imagination. He says his son initially didn’t care that much, as Dunn is always drawing on something, but when the sketches made his little boy more popular at school, things changed.

“His friends and some teachers asked for them after he's had lunch. I think that was bigger deal to him than the bags themselves,” Dunn notes.

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Dunn spends about a half hour drawing each bag, and often employs his 7-year-old to color in the details. He prepares the next day's edition during his own lunch. Favorites include the Calvin and Hobbs piece and the “monster food ones.”


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While the lunches may arrive in style, Dunn says there’s nothing all that exciting inside.

He comments, “My son's lunches are usually pretty normal, the kid is addicted to PB&J and apples.”

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To see more of Dunn's work, check out his Facebook page: facebook.com/TheBagDad 

 

 

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